The Millennium Project

Purpose: Improve humanity’s prospects for building a better future.

Mission: Improve thinking about the future and make that thinking available
through a variety of media for feedback to accumulate wisdom about the future for better decisions today.

Vision: A global foresight network of Nodes, information, and software, building a global collective intelligence system recognized for its ability to improve prospects for humanity. A think tank on behalf of humanity, not on behalf of a government, or an issue, or an ideology, but on behalf of building a better future for all of us.

  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Baku, Azerbaijan
  • Beijing, China
  • Belgrade, Serbia
  • Berlin/Cologne, Germany
  • Bogotá, Colombia
  • Brussels Area, Belgium
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Cairo, Egypt
  • Caracas, Venezuela
  • Colombo, Sri Lanka
  • Dubai, UAE
  • Helsinki, Finland
  • Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Istanbul, Turkey
  • Kuwait, Gulf Region
  • La Paz/ Santa Cruz, Bolivia
  • Lima, Peru
  • Lisbon, Portugal
  • Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • London/Pontypridd, UK
  • New Delhi, India
  • Mexico City, Mexico
  • Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Nairobi, Kenya
  • Paris, France
  • Perth/Sydney, Australia
  • Penang, Malaysia
  • Prague, Czech Republic
  • Podgorica, Montenegro
  • Pretoria/Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Rome/Pescara, Italy
  • San Sebastián, Spain
  • Santiago, Chile
  • Santo Domingo, DR
  • São Paulo, Brazil
  • Seoul, Korea
  • Silicon Valley, USA
  • Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Tehran, Iran
  • Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Tokyo, Japan
  • Toronto, Canada
  • Tunis, Tunisia
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • Arts/Media Node, Global
  • Cyber Node, Internet
  • Washington, DC (coordinating office)

History

The Millennium Project was founded in 1996 after a three-year feasibility study with the United Nations University, Smithsonian Institution, Futures Group International, and the American Council for the UNU. It is now an independent non-profit global participatory futures research think tank of futurists, scholars, business planners, and policy makers who work for international organizations, governments, corporations, NGOs, and universities. The Millennium Project manages a coherent and cumulative process that collects and assesses judgments from over 3,500 people since the beginning of the project selected by its 63 Nodes around the world. The work is distilled in its annual “State of the Future”, “Futures Research Methodology” series, and special studies.

The Project was initiated by the Smithsonian Institution, The Futures Group International, and the United Nations University (UNU). It was created through a three-year feasibility study funded by the U.S. EPA, UNDP, and UNESCO, in which participated over 200 futurists and scholars from about 50 countries. Phase 1 of the feasibility study began in 1992 with funding from U.S. EPA to identify and link futurists and scholars around the world to create the initial design of the Project and conduct a first test on population and environmental issues. In 1993/94 during Phase II, a series of reports were created on futures research methodology and long-range issues important to Africa, funded by UNDP. Phase III, conducted in 1994/95 under the auspices of the UNU/WIDER and funded by UNESCO concluded with the final feasibility study report. Today, the Project accomplishes its mandate by connecting individuals and institutions around the world to collaborate on research to address important global challenges. Since 1996,  about 2,500 futurists, scholars, decisionmakers, and business planners from over 50 countries contributed with their views to the Millennium Project research.

The project is not a one-time study of the future, but provides an on-going capacity as a geographically and institutionally dispersed think tank.  It was selected among the 100 Best Practices by UN Habitat, among best 7 foresight organizations by US Office of Energy, eleven of the thirteen annual State of the Future reports were selected by Future Survey as among the year’s best books on the future, and the international journal Technological Forecasting & Social Change dedicates several entire issues to the annual State of the Future.